《Jersey用户指南》翻译邀请

7月并发网组织大家翻译《Jersey用户指南》。有兴趣的同学可以通过评论领取,翻译完成之后再并发网直接提交审核。

一次领取一篇,一篇建议领取一个章节,翻译完成之后可以继续领取,领取文章后最好在一个星期内翻译完成,如果不能完成翻译请通过评论告知,以便于其他人可以继续翻译。

Table of Contents

Preface
1. Getting Started
1.1. Creating a New Project from Maven Archetype
1.2. Exploring the Newly Created Project
1.3. Running the Project
1.4. Creating a JavaEE Web Application
1.5. Creating a Web Application that can be deployed on Heroku
1.5.1. Deploy it on Heroku
1.6. Exploring Other Jersey Examples
2. Modules and dependencies
2.1. Java SE Compatibility
2.2. Introduction to Jersey dependencies
2.3. Common Jersey Use Cases
2.3.1. Servlet based application on Glassfish
2.3.2. Servlet based server-side application
2.3.3. Client application on JDK
2.3.4. Server-side application on supported containers
2.4. List of modules
3. JAX-RS Application, Resources and Sub-Resources
3.1. Root Resource Classes
3.1.1. @Path
3.1.2. @GET, @PUT, @POST, @DELETE, … (HTTP Methods)
3.1.3. @Produces
3.1.4. @Consumes
3.2. Parameter Annotations (@*Param)
3.3. Sub-resources
3.4. Life-cycle of Root Resource Classes
3.5. Rules of Injection
3.6. Use of @Context
3.7. Programmatic resource model
4. Application Deployment and Runtime Environments
4.1. Introduction
4.2. JAX-RS Application Model
4.3. Auto-Discoverable Features
4.3.1. Configuring Feature Auto-discovery Mechanism
4.4. Configuring the Classpath Scanning
4.5. Java SE Deployment Environments
4.5.1. HTTP servers
4.6. Creating programmatic JAX-RS endpoint
4.7. Servlet-based Deployment
4.7.1. Servlet 2.x Container
4.7.2. Servlet 3.x Container
4.7.3. Jersey Servlet container modules
4.8. Java EE Platform
4.8.1. Managed Beans
4.8.2. Context and Dependency Injection (CDI)
4.8.3. Enterprise Java Beans (EJB)
4.8.4. Java EE Servers
4.9. OSGi
4.9.1. Enabling the OSGi shell in Glassfish
4.9.2. WAB Example
4.9.3. HTTP Service Example
4.10. Other Environments
4.10.1. Oracle Java Cloud Service
5. Client API
5.1. Uniform Interface Constraint
5.2. Ease of use and reusing JAX-RS artifacts
5.3. Overview of the Client API
5.3.1. Getting started with the client API
5.3.2. Creating and configuring a Client instance
5.3.3. Targeting a web resource
5.3.4. Identifying resource on WebTarget
5.3.5. Invoking a HTTP request
5.3.6. Example summary
5.4. Java instances and types for representations
5.4.1. Adding support for new representations
5.5. Client Transport Connectors
5.6. Using client request and response filters
5.7. Closing connections
5.8. Injections into client providers
5.9. Securing a Client
5.9.1. Http Authentication Support
6. Reactive Jersey Client API
6.1. Motivation for Reactive Client Extension
6.2. Usage and Extension Modules
6.3. Supported Reactive Libraries
6.3.1. RxJava (Observable)
6.3.2. Java 8 (CompletionStage and CompletableFuture)
6.3.3. Guava (ListenableFuture and Futures)
6.3.4. JSR-166e (CompletableFuture)
6.4. Implementing Support for Custom Reactive Libraries (SPI)
6.5. Examples
7. Representations and Responses
7.1. Representations and Java Types
7.2. Building Responses
7.3. WebApplicationException and Mapping Exceptions to Responses
7.4. Conditional GETs and Returning 304 (Not Modified) Responses
8. JAX-RS Entity Providers
8.1. Introduction
8.2. How to Write Custom Entity Providers
8.2.1. MessageBodyWriter
8.2.2. MessageBodyReader
8.3. Entity Provider Selection
8.4. Jersey MessageBodyWorkers API
8.5. Default Jersey Entity Providers
9. Support for Common Media Type Representations
9.1. JSON
9.1.1. Approaches to JSON Support
9.1.2. MOXy
9.1.3. Java API for JSON Processing (JSON-P)
9.1.4. Jackson (1.x and 2.x)
9.1.5. Jettison
9.1.6. @JSONP – JSON with Padding Support
9.2. XML
9.2.1. Low level XML support
9.2.2. Getting started with JAXB
9.2.3. POJOs
9.2.4. Using custom JAXBContext
9.2.5. MOXy
9.3. Multipart
9.3.1. Overview
9.3.2. Client
9.3.3. Server
10. Filters and Interceptors
10.1. Introduction
10.2. Filters
10.2.1. Server filters
10.2.2. Client filters
10.3. Interceptors
10.4. Filter and interceptor execution order
10.5. Name binding
10.6. Dynamic binding
10.7. Priorities
11. Asynchronous Services and Clients
11.1. Asynchronous Server API
11.1.1. Asynchronous Server-side Callbacks
11.1.2. Chunked Output
11.2. Client API
11.2.1. Asynchronous Client Callbacks
11.2.2. Chunked input
12. URIs and Links
12.1. Building URIs
12.2. Resolve and Relativize
12.3. Link
13. Declarative Hyperlinking
13.1. Dependency
13.2. Links in Representations
13.3. Binding Template Parameters
13.4. Conditional Link Injection
13.5. List of Link Injection
13.6. Link Headers
13.7. Prevent Recursive Injection
13.8. Configure and register
14. Programmatic API for Building Resources
14.1. Introduction
14.2. Programmatic Hello World example
14.2.1. Deployment of programmatic resources
14.3. Additional examples
14.4. Model processors
15. Server-Sent Events (SSE) Support
15.1. What are Server-Sent Events
15.2. When to use Server-Sent Events
15.3. Jersey Server-Sent Events API
15.4. Implementing SSE support in a JAX-RS resource
15.4.1. Simple SSE resource method
15.4.2. Broadcasting with Jersey SSE
15.5. Consuming SSE events with Jersey clients
15.5.1. Reading SSE events with EventInput
15.5.2. Asynchronous SSE processing with EventSource
16. Security
16.1. Securing server
16.1.1. SecurityContext
16.1.2. Authorization – securing resources
16.2. Client Security
16.3. OAuth Support
16.3.1. OAuth 1
16.3.2. OAuth 2 Support
17. WADL Support
17.1. WADL introduction
17.2. Configuration
17.3. Extended WADL support
18. Bean Validation Support
18.1. Bean Validation Dependencies
18.2. Enabling Bean Validation in Jersey
18.3. Configuring Bean Validation Support
18.4. Validating JAX-RS resources and methods
18.4.1. Constraint Annotations
18.4.2. Annotation constraints and Validators
18.4.3. Entity Validation
18.4.4. Annotation Inheritance
18.5. @ValidateOnExecution
18.6. Injecting
18.7. Error Reporting
18.7.1. ValidationError
18.8. Example
19. Entity Data Filtering
19.1. Enabling and configuring Entity Filtering in your application
19.2. Components used to describe Entity Filtering concepts
19.3. Using custom annotations to filter entities
19.3.1. Server-side Entity Filtering
19.3.2. Client-side Entity Filtering
19.4. Role-based Entity Filtering using (javax.annotation.security) annotations
19.5. Entity Filtering based on dynamic and configurable query parameters
19.6. Defining custom handling for entity-filtering annotations
19.7. Supporting Entity Data Filtering in custom entity providers or frameworks
19.8. Modules with support for Entity Data Filtering
19.9. Examples
20. MVC Templates
20.1. Viewable
20.2. @Template
20.2.1. Annotating Resource methods
20.2.2. Annotating Resource classes
20.3. Absolute vs. Relative template reference
20.3.1. Relative template reference
20.3.2. Absolute template reference
20.4. Handling errors with MVC
20.4.1. MVC & Bean Validation
20.5. Registration and Configuration
20.6. Supported templating engines
20.6.1. Mustache
20.6.2. Freemarker
20.6.3. JSP
20.7. Writing Custom Templating Engines
20.8. Other Examples
21. Logging
21.1. Logging traffic
21.1.1. Introduction
21.1.2. Configuration and registering
22. Monitoring and Diagnostics
22.1. Monitoring Jersey Applications
22.1.1. Introduction
22.1.2. Event Listeners
22.2. Tracing Support
22.2.1. Configuration options
22.2.2. Tracing Log
22.2.3. Configuring tracing support via HTTP request headers
22.2.4. Format of the HTTP response headers
22.2.5. Tracing Examples
23. Custom Injection and Lifecycle Management
23.1. Implementing Custom Injection Provider
23.2. Defining Custom Injection Annotation
23.3. Custom Life Cycle Management
24. Jersey CDI Container Agnostic Support
24.1. Introduction
24.2. Containers Known to Work With Jersey CDI Support
24.3. Request Scope Binding
24.4. Jersey Weld SE Support
25. Spring DI
25.1. Dependencies
25.2. Registration and Configuration
25.3. Example
26. Jersey Test Framework
26.1. Basics
26.2. Supported Containers
26.3. Running TestNG Tests
26.4. Advanced features
26.4.1. JerseyTest Features
26.4.2. External container
26.4.3. Test Client configuration
26.4.4. Accessing the logged test records programmatically
26.5. Parallel Testing with Jersey Test Framework
27. Building and Testing Jersey
27.1. Checking Out the Source
27.2. Building the Source
27.3. Testing
27.4. Using NetBeans
28. Migration Guide
28.1. Migrating from Jersey 2.22 to 2.23
28.1.1. Release 2.23 Highlights
28.1.2. Deprecated APIs
28.1.3. Breaking Changes
28.2. Migrating from Jersey 2.21 to 2.22
28.2.1. Breaking Changes
28.3. Migrating from Jersey 2.19 to 2.20
28.3.1. Breaking Changes
28.4. Migrating from Jersey 2.18 to 2.19
28.4.1. Breaking Changes
28.5. Migrating from Jersey 2.17 to 2.18
28.5.1. Release 2.18 Highlights
28.5.2. Removed deprecated APIs
28.5.3. Breaking Changes
28.6. Migrating from Jersey 2.16 to 2.17
28.6.1. Release 2.17 Highlights
28.7. Migrating from Jersey 2.15 to 2.16
28.7.1. Release 2.16 Highlights
28.7.2. Deprecated APIs
28.7.3. Breaking Changes
28.8. Migrating to 2.15
28.8.1. Release 2.15 Highlights
28.8.2. Breaking Changes
28.9. Migrating from Jersey 2.11 to 2.12
28.9.1. Release 2.12 Highlights
28.9.2. Breaking Changes
28.10. Migrating from Jersey 2.10 to 2.11
28.10.1. Release 2.11 Highlights
28.11. Migrating from Jersey 2.9 to 2.10
28.11.1. Removed deprecated APIs
28.12. Migrating from Jersey 2.8 to 2.9
28.12.1. Release 2.9 Highlights
28.12.2. Changes
28.13. Migrating from Jersey 2.7 to 2.8
28.13.1. Changes
28.14. Migrating from Jersey 2.6 to 2.7
28.14.1. Changes
28.15. Migrating from Jersey 2.5.1 to 2.6
28.15.1. Guava and ASM have been embedded
28.15.2. Deprecated APIs
28.15.3. Removed deprecated APIs
28.16. Migrating from Jersey 2.5 to 2.5.1
28.17. Migrating from Jersey 2.4.1 to 2.5
28.17.1. Client-side API and SPI changes
28.17.2. Other changes
28.18. Migrating from Jersey 2.4 to 2.4.1
28.19. Migrating from Jersey 2.3 to 2.4
28.20. Migrating from Jersey 2.0, 2.1 or 2.2 to 2.3
28.21. Migrating from Jersey 1.x to 2.0
28.21.1. Server API
28.21.2. Migrating Jersey Client API
28.21.3. JSON support changes
A. Configuration Properties
A.1. Common (client/server) configuration properties
A.2. Server configuration properties
A.3. Servlet configuration properties
A.4. Client configuration properties

原创文章,转载请注明: 转载自并发编程网 – ifeve.com本文链接地址: 《Jersey用户指南》翻译邀请


方 腾飞

花名清英,并发网(ifeve.com)创始人,畅销书《Java并发编程的艺术》作者,蚂蚁金服技术专家。目前工作于支付宝微贷事业部,关注互联网金融,并发编程和敏捷实践。微信公众号aliqinying。

Latest posts by 方 腾飞 (see all)

FavoriteLoading添加本文到我的收藏
  • Trackback 关闭
  • 评论 (10)
    • 白驹过隙
    • 2016/07/12 11:49下午

    申请翻译第1章。

    • lambdaLi
    • 2016/07/15 10:46上午

    申请翻译第二章

    • darouwan
    • 2016/07/17 9:44上午

    请问一个章节,指的是1,2,3这样大章节吗?

  1. 这个工程不小啊。点个赞,抽空选一个来搞。

    • 白驹过隙
    • 2016/07/18 11:37下午

    序言已经翻译好,请问如何提交?

您必须 登陆 后才能发表评论

return top